Three Traits Keep You Employed

Posted by Judy Anne Cavey on Aug 8, 2012 in , | No Comments

In tough times, employees must go the extra mile to stay employed.

Below are three traits employers are looking for in employees…

Be Positive

The first trait employers recently mentioned was that the employee must have a positive attitude. This is conveyed in several ways;

1) The smile on your face speaks volumes. Sounds simple doesn’t it? It is, and yet you’d be surprised how often employees show up for work grumpy and can’t even muster up a simple “good morning” to coworkers. If this is you, consider getting more sleep, learn better ways to cope with stress and work out any issues you have that are keeping you from enjoying your life. A pleasant work environment is essential to worker productivity. Let that stage be set with your good attitude so it spreads to coworkers and makes work more enjoyable for all.

Talent is Not Enough

Posted by Judy Anne Cavey on Aug 6, 2012 in , , | No Comments

Why is it that many talented people never reach their full potential?

Talent gives an advantage that lasts a short time. In order to grow to your full potential, there are necessary steps that should be considered.

Dr. John C. Maxwell, speaker, author and founder of several leadership organizations who communicates his principles to Fortune 500 companies, international marketing organizations and professional sports groups, suggests: “Too many talented people who start with an advantage over others lose that advantage because they rest on their talent instead of raising it.” Basically, talent alone doesn’t keep a person at the top, we’ve seen this countless times in the workplace.

How to be a Winner

Posted by Judy Anne Cavey on Jul 16, 2012 in , , | No Comments

You don’t have to be an Olympic athlete to be a winner.

In Dana Hudepohl’s article, Unleash Your Inner Winner, (Fitness magazine), she states “…think and act like a champion and get every damn thing you want.” Is that possible? Let’s have a look…

Winning

Charlie Sheen took the word “winning” and turned it into something quite different than what we’re discussing here. Experts on the subject say winning comes from working hard–really hard. Just ask any one of the U.S. Olympians now readying themselves for the 2012 Summer Games in London. 

What is an Apprenticeship?

Posted by Judy Anne Cavey on Jul 2, 2012 in , , | No Comments

 

Apprenticeships are training programs that use both classroom and on-the-job learning.

The idea of apprenticeships is to prepare people for careers in industries such as manufacturing, construction and new emerging industries (information technology, energy, etc.).

Apprenticeships help job seekers learn new skills, making them more marketable to employers seeking qualified workers.

Apprenticeship programs can be through individual employers, joint employer and labor groups, and/or employer associations.

Skills Needed for Success

Posted by Judy Anne Cavey on May 21, 2012 in , , | 1 Comment

Listed below are basic skills and transferable skills required for most jobs.

Most college grads will have the basics, and a few of the transferable skills, if they’ve sought out opportunities. See how many of the basic skills you possess–hopefully you have all of them! But if you don’t, now is the time to acquire what you lack to make yourself marketable in your job search. The transferables are what you’ll take from one job to the next and are often associated with higher pay and responsibility.

The Importance of Volunteer Work

Posted by Judy Anne Cavey on Mar 14, 2012 in , , | No Comments

 

 

Volunteer to increase your chances of being hired.

Volunteer work isn’t just something you do to look good on a resume. Thousands of people have turned their volunteer experience into a life-changing experience for themselves–and those they’ve helped. And if you’re a college student or grad, it’s a must-have on your resume to show you’ve taken the initiative to gain experience and skills.

Need Confidence?

Posted by Judy Anne Cavey on Mar 8, 2012 in , , | No Comments

 

 Fake it until you acquire it!

“Do a consistent job of pretending you feel capable and charismatic and you’ll convince everyone, even yourself, that you’ve got things under control,” states Jason Selk, Ed.D., director of mental training for the 2011 World Series–winning St. Louis Cardinals and author of Executive Toughness.

Confidence (being self-assured) is valued in our American culture. Without it, you’ll find succeeding in college, career, and other aspects of life difficult. 

Below are simple tips to help you gain greater confidence at school, during an interview, and at work.

Want Work? Solve a Problem!

Posted by Judy Anne Cavey on Dec 8, 2011 in , , | No Comments

 

 

“I reinvent myself every day”, claims Leif Hansen, founder of Shasta’s ski patrol.

Living in a rural community, such as Shasta County in Northern California, presents added difficulties when it comes to employment. But Leif and his wife Justi, go with the flow by finding opportunities where they can in their small town economy.

Leif now does solar installations besides his ski patrol duties in the winter months. Justi enjoyed climbing mountains and was a guide when she sought out advice on how to become self-employed. Going to her local JEDI Institute for Economic Development, she discovered her skills climbing mountains and leading people through the wilderness translated well into counseling others. She began working for JEDI, helping people change careers, or to become entrepreneurs.

Occupy Critical Thinking (Part Two)

Posted by Judy Anne Cavey on Nov 10, 2011 in , , | No Comments

Does the workplace allow for much Critical Thinking?

As stated in Part One of Occupy Critical Thinking, some employers have complained younger workers don’t have Critical Thinking skills necessary for their jobs. But, as many college students and recent grads know all too well, there are entry level jobs which don’t often allow for opportunities to use their Critical Thinking skills. Usually, a work day might be filled with following set rules, regulations, and procedures–in jobs some employees say “a monkey could do this!” Employees who deviate from the norm, attempting to use their Critical Thinking skills, could suffer negative consequences.

Occupy Critical Thinking (Part One)

Posted by Judy Anne Cavey on Nov 9, 2011 in , , | 2 Comments

In a recent article, employers complained younger workers don’t have Critical Thinking skills.

Having read that statement, (and using my Critical Thinking skills) I didn’t feel it was completely accurate, especially in light of certain political developments world-wide involving people under 30 years old. The article pointed out employers believed older workers had the edge, possessing more Critical Thinking skills than their younger coworkers.

What I know is this: Critical Thinking skills continue to be in demand and younger workers must convey they possess them.