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Katie Hoskins

Agreeing with the above post, that just like any other career, the excitement of the job is truly contingent on the individual. However, like many topics, accounting in the classroom can often become boring and tedious because of the lecture style of professors. But accounting in "the real world" is a completely different subject than it is in the classroom. First, there are so many opportunities in an accounting career. You can choose from numerous pathways, including tax accounting, auditing, not-for-profit accounting, government accounting, the I.R.S., working for accounting boards such as FASB, PCAOB, and IFRS, and more. The best way to learn if accounting as a career is interesting and exciting to you rather than accounting in the classroom is through an internship. The "Big Four" Accounting Firms and countless medium-to-small accounting firms offer winter and spring internships in auditing, tax, and consulting. These are an excellent way to find out if accounting suits you (and is how I found out I really enjoyed an accounting career).

Answered 2 years ago

Katie Hoskins
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Russ McQueen

The mechanics of accounting can, in and of themselves, be dull and repetitive. However, accounting is set in businesses of all kinds. One of the best ways to experience and learn about real businesses is to become involved in accounting. Those who learn the accounting and related finance principles very often find themselves with opportunities to branch out into industries and businesses that excite them, or into consulting positions in which they can teach and guide others, or even into parallel fields, such as financial management, tax planning, business structuring, and many others.

The question, "Is accounting dull?" is not really the right question. The right question is, "Can the field of accounting provide opportunities to explore, learn and dive into other areas which are truly exciting?" The answer is that it is up to the individual, but there is nothing inherent in the field of accounting that would stop anyone from developing such opportunities or from pursuing a path of continuous learning and experience.

Answered 2 years ago

Russ McQueen