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4 Answers

1

Howie Wallach

I think there are a few important factors you should determine up front:
Why do you want an undergraduate degree?
What do you want to study (what will be your major)?
What is your ultimate goal; Is the degree to advance at work, for a new career, just for personal satisfaction?
Where do you want to go to school?

What type of college—conventional college or correspondence college?
Some colleges offer adult/night school degree programs and some give credit for work experience.

How will you fund your education?
Does your employer offer tuition reimbursement?

A good site to go to for info is princetonreview.com
The “college” tab will take you to a ton of information on colleges, careers, etc.

Best of Luck.
HW

Answered 2 years ago

Howie Wallach
0

Terri

Take the pay cut and work part-time. Get a loan or your parents to fund your schooling. Don't pass on college for work. Education will get you a far better paying job than work, UNLESS, you are in a profession where you can advance AND you like what you do.

Answered 2 years ago

Terri
1

Murray Feldman

If you are earning an undergraduate degree on a part-time basis, you must realize
you will probably be 35 or older by the time you graduate. What ever your profession
will be, you will be competing against 35 year people' who probably have some experience.
You might be at a disadvantage.
Murray

Answered 3 years ago

Murray Feldman
0

Paul DuVal

Believe it or not, you can earn an undergraduate degree AND work full-time. You just have to find the right educational resource to make it happen. Online degree programs and accelerated learning programs at colleges and universities have become more common, even for MBA's. I live in CA, but I earned my undergrad degree through Colorado State in two years. All while working full-time, being a parent, and caring for elderly parents. And I'm older than you. So get out there and do the research on opportunities like this. As long as the school/program is accredited and has a positive reputation, then it's a good choice.

Bottom line is this: If you put your mind to something, and you give it 100%, you can do anything. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise.

Good luck.

Answered 1 year ago

Paul DuVal