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Laura Weaver

I am a chemical engineer. I chose that because my dad was an engineer and provided me good guidance. I was good at chemistry, and math actually I was excellent in Math, liked chemistry the best of the core science classes in HS - so I chose Chemical engineering.

You could choose chemistry or engineering. If you like biology consider something in life sciences. If you don't like math - stay away from engineering.

I work with customers on a daily basis - so what I learned in chem engineering in college is far removed from what I do and have done for 28 years in Chemical engineering in corporate america. I'm a good problem solver which is basically what a degree in engineering teaches you how to do. How to look at a problem with data and science and make good choices. If you solve customer problem then it is a win win for my company and the customer.

Answered 3 years ago

Laura Weaver
0

Astor Green

It is very challenging, both intellectually as well as emotionally. There’s always a need for medicines, and there’s always a need for someone to help make them, figure out how to make them, figure out what to make, how to be sure they are properly made, etc, etc. I have a Ph.D. in chemistry and on a daily basis my job is very varied. I am responsible for all analytical aspects of developing a product. One day I can be reviewing journal articles and information from a maker of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), so that I can figure out how to measure its amount in the product. Another day I can be actually performing those test that I figured out, or running tests to be sure the analytical method I choose actually is specific, linear, precise and accurate, etc (method validation). Another day I can be figuring out which test should be performed and what results should be expected (setting the specifications). Yet another day I could be helping the quality control department figure out what the problem is with an analytical method they are running, or responding to questions the FDA has asked the company, or training someone in a particular analytical technique. Another day I can be studying up on how to perform a brand new technique or how to use a new instrument. I’m very biased, but I think that the most exciting place in a pharmaceutical company is in the development department. This is where we figure out almost all of what is needed to get a product to market. The rest of the company ends up doing what we figure out, from how to make it to how to test it, what to do if something unusual happens. I call it the Special Forces department, we are asked to do or figure out almost anything….Astor

Answered 3 years ago

Astor Green