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Cecille Navidad

Some charter schools will hire individuals without teaching credentials in the state where I live. However, they usually have a clause in your contract that stipulates you must begin to pursue certification after a certain amount of time. The expectation is that you eventually earn your certification.

Answered 1 year ago

Cecille  Navidad
0

Christine Andrelczyk

It depends what kind of position you're seeking. If you want a traditional classroom instructor role in a K-12 setting, then yes, you need to receive a state educator license and endorsements for your areas of concentration. However, if that's not exactly what you're looking for, there are other positions you could explore. Being a teacher aid or a substitute teacher does not require the same credentials (but typically also do not offer the same level of salary, benefits, or employment security). For teaching beyond the high school level, you need a master's degree but no teaching credentials to become an instructor at a community college.

Answered 1 year ago

Christine Andrelczyk
0

Kimberly Taylor

It depends of where you want to teach and the type of credential you are speaking of. If you'd like to teach in K-12, then yes, you will need to get a college degree and get licensed by your state. If you'd like to teach at a community college or 4-year university, you can get an adjunct (part-time) position by obtaining your Bachelors degree and then a Masters degree in the field in which you want to teach. A teacher must have 18 hours in a discipline to teach in that area. I taught for University of Phoenix for seven years with my Masters degree and now I am working at Western Governors University as faculty.

Answered 1 year ago

Kimberly Taylor