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Searching for good majors/degree plans (Bachelor level) for education that cover a wider range of interaction with students of all ages?? I want to be a guidance counselor, so that sets up the Master degree range, but I am unsure of what to do in between. It seems you can either get an Early Childhood, Elementary, OR Secondary Education degree, but I'd like something less focused. Any ideas?

Since I asked my first question on Student Mentor about degree plans, and fields, I have earned an Associate degree in History, initially planning on becoming a history teacher. I am a tutor and have worked with students from middle school to early college. I now work at a center for early childhood, specifically with a before/after school, and Pre-K program. I love this job because it is shaping what I want for my future career. I want to be a school guidance counselor, not limiting myself to any age range (4-year-olds and high school seniors alike!), and I'd really like to earn a Bachelor's Degree that reflects that before I take the necessary steps to become a counselor. Any information on some more well-rounded degree plans would sure help! Thanks in advance!

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2 Answers

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Ken Simmons

Sounds like you are interested in some good areas. The first thing to do is to go to the counseling office of your school to arrange to take an interest and aptitude test to see how your personality traits stack up with various career areas. When you find an appropriate area, go to the Director of Alumni Relations to arrange to talk to graduates of your school who are doing what you think that you want to do. Talk to them..Visit them. Shadow them.

When I was doing college recruiting, the most frustrating thing that happened was hiring a graduate and putting hem/her into a job and finding out that he/she did not like the job for which he/she had studied, because they had never taken the time and make the effort to see that they liked and enjoyed the practical application of what they were studying.

Here are some helpful tips:

Networking:
https://www.wikihow.com/Network
https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event
https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-job-search-strategy-thatll-make-you-15-times-more-likely-to-be-hired

Networking for Introverts
https://www.themuse.com/advice/an-introverts-guide-to-networking

Answered 3 years ago

Ken Simmons
0

Tanya Zhelezcheva

If you decide to remain in education, I think it would serve you well to expand your skills. For instance, in addition to working on your writing skills, you may want to take courses on statistics. Much of the literature on education offers data analysis, and it would serve you well-now or later--if you are familiar with this field: how to critique the data, how to interpret it, etc. Statistics may not be the most exciting subject, but it is a skill you may use later in case you decide to switch careers. In addition, assessment is very important in education and relies on statistics. So if you decide to pursue a Ph.D., it will come in handy! Good luck!

Answered 3 years ago

Tanya Zhelezcheva