Want free career or academic advice
from a professional?

Have an Answer?

1 Answer

0

Samantha Brower

I have a degree in Broadcast Journalism/Communication with a concentration in Media Production.

With a degree in Communication, you have options in the corporate world. The ability to write and edit copy is a HUGE advantage in the corporate world. You can work at an ad agency, which will allow you some creativity while working a pretty normal schedule. You can also work in corporate communications, which is less creative but allows for a decent salary and a 9-5 schedule.

I'm not sure if your degree also includes Journalism, but if it does, I can share some advice. If you don't mind a weird schedule and tight deadlines, an exciting career in broadcast or print media would be fun for you. I worked at a 24-hour news station and it was great, but the schedule was too difficult for me (I worked the 4 am shift). But the knowledge I gained was amazing. If that's the path you choose, you'll learn things like video editing, styling content for broadcast, calling leads, combing through press releases, etc. It's very exciting work sometimes and it can be very rewarding. But if you're not interested in news, it can be a little draining.

If you're looking for a steady 9-5 job, you could work at an ad/marketing agency. I worked as a social media consultant/writer for a national ad agency and they loved that I had experience working at the news station. It wasn't until I graduated that I realized how hard it is for employers to find decent writers. Your ability to write and edit copy will definitely give you an edge in the corporate world.

As far as writing for a newspaper, I don't have any direct experience except for the school paper in college. It was a lot of fun and very exciting. I preferred it over working at the news station, but that's just my preference. Writing for a newspaper allows you more alone time and if you're able to get a job as a reporter, you can write about things you care about. There's also less pressure of meeting a deadline than broadcast journalism. With TV news, it's all about getting stories on-air as soon as possible. With a newspaper, you have the time to get the information ready by print-time, which is always the same.

Hope this helps!

Answered 1 year ago

Samantha Brower