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1

Danielle S

Different areas of business require different skills. Some of these skills can be learned through a college program and others require natural talent. There are many people who have degrees and did everything by the book, but still failed at being an entrepreneur. The key to owning a functioning and profitable business is passion and determination on the owners part.

I have owned a small business for the past 4 years. I have a B.S. in Political Science and a minor in Pre-Law, a M.S. in Law, and I am currently working on my PhD in Business Psychology with a specialization in Organizational Leadership. With all that said I can't say that any one degree has completely contributed to me successfully owning my own business. I am in my mid-20's and my perspective may differ significantly from those who have been in business as long as I have been around. However, I can say that what made the difference of my business making it versus failing, is the fact that I had a mentor that operated a business to my level/ideal of successful. I watched and study how they operated and had a go-to person when things happened that the text-book didn't explain. As the gentleman mentioned below, a good mentor can mean the difference in failing and succeeding.

I would also suggest as one person did already, to look into a entrepreneurship program instead of business. A business degree (in my opinion) is more geared towards working in a business setting and moving up to management, not starting a business and starting at the top while figuring out how to manage at the same time. I took entrepreneurship as a minor (but dropped it to graduate early) and it was more useful than majority of my classes. It pushes you beyond designing a business plan and to the point of being innovative, creative, and gives the implementation of real-world application.

Hopefully this helps and good luck!

Answered 3 years ago

Danielle S
0

Robert Stein

What degree to get may not be the question you want answered.

I suggest you look for entrepreneurship programs at local colleges. “Small Business Incubators” might also have some opportunities for you. The idea is to affiliate yourself with people who are building small businesses from scratch. Pick people with a decent outlook on life, something to teach you about management and business, and a well thought out business plan.

One of the big keys is to associate yourself with honest people who can teach you something in addition to giving you the opportunity to earn. You are not looking for the person who is a repeat failure with a great idea “this time.” People who have been successful in one area are likely to be successful in other areas. These people are always looking for high potential apprentices.

You might also join the local Chamber of Commerce and start attending council meetings and other places people who are already successful frequent. Keep in mind that “successful” can have a variety of definitions. The point is that people do not donate their time unless they have demonstrated some skills and been successful at doing something else already.

Answered 3 years ago

Robert Stein
-1

Alexis Cline

.... A business degree obviously. It mainly depends on what kind of business you'll want to start. Say you want to own a salon. A degree in Hair & Makeup, maybe nails (depending on what you'll offer) will help. You always want to know what you're doing!

Answered 3 years ago

Alexis Cline