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Alan Bockhaus

I work for the Department Of Environmental Protection, Florida. There are so many various skill sets needed at our agency. We have a complete high tech lab for analyzing water and soil samples, bugs and vegetation samples. All of these are very unique and different skills. Lab personnel that sample water, counting bacteria and testing for nitrates, they could not tell a pine tree from a live oak. If the lab sounds like a possibility, math is a must.
In the main building there are dozens of departments for the oversight of EPA, Federal, State and local rules. Water is the most extensive program we have. Water Management Districts. National Hydraulic Dataset, Land Use/Land Cover data bases. Springs Management. Best Management Action Plans. Sewage permitting and enforcement. Cattle Feeding Operations. Best practice Agriculture. I mean, DOZENS of departments.
The one thing all departments have need of is the mapping department, or GIS. That's what I do. I create the Land Use/Land Cover data set published on line every three years. I do field site verification visits and take vegetation and soil samples and have the lab folks identify them and report back. I take GNSS data and digital photos and compile all this info into maps for the different departs to use. The TMDL group, Total Maximum Daily Load, use the Land use coverage for formulating nitrate runoff from land use pollution.
Then there is the Law Enforcement wing, Homeland Security folks, there is all the permitting and paperwork involved with that. We have weekly public meeting for changing rules and presenting the public with information.
So...Environmental Science is full of fun, interesting, and often boring repetitious work.
We can yak about this more if you like what I have to say...good luck on your goals.

Answered 2 years ago

Alan Bockhaus
0

Jim Gatti

Environmental science in one of those careers that requires a lot of math for the degree, but the field itself doesn't require a lot unless you looking to do more of the analysis part. there are different types of areas in environmental science. you can try this web site for more information hope it helps

http://careerplanning.about.com/od/occupations/p/environment_sci.htm

Answered 2 years ago

Jim Gatti