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Rohan

The dependency of Physics in becoming an Engineer largely depends on which engineering path you choose.
Fields like computer science engineering or telecommunication engineering do not have even 20% of of physics concepts.
If you are into Mechanical or civil engineering, your dependency on physics is fairly high
Many engineering jobs out there in market have nothing to do with the concepts of physics.
So it all depends on the specific engineering area.

Answered 2 years ago

Rohan
0

James T Gibbs, PE, PMP

Physics always terrified me in school, and I avoided it as long as I could. I had a Phys/Chem class in my freshman year in high school and didn't do very well with it. I didn't take physics again until it was needed for my engineering degree. I loved it! It is such a fascinating subject that I still read about physics in non-fiction books and online magazine articles. No subject helped me understand the way the world works like physics did. I do not commonly use physics equations in my job, but I happily apply physics principles every day.

Answered 3 years ago

James T Gibbs, PE, PMP
0

Lee Kashka

Math and Physics are the basic building blocks of any engineer. I'm working as an engineer in a field that isn't even remotely related to the field that I studied in college. I can say that I have used Physics, Math, Chemistry, and most of the other basic building blocks throughout my career. However, I can't say the same for some of the more specialized classes.

The main thing I liked about the engineering career field is that it forced me to take some of the harder classes in Science and Technology. This will help you go a long way, regardless of what job you end up taking after you graduate.

Answered 3 years ago

Lee Kashka