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1

Timeca

This is my field and I agree with you in that Human Resources is fascinating. There are several occupations you could get into, such as Benefits Administration, Compensation and Benefits, Employee Relations and Recruiting/Talent Acquisition, just to name a few.

Answered 3 years ago

Timeca
0

Stephanie Miller

There are so many options! You could work as a recruiter that seeks candidates for positions within an organization or your could work in benefits, which includes life/health/dental insurance plan administration and other wellness benefits. You could also do work in performance management or talent management. There are also options to work in a highly specialized area like employee or labor relations.

I have a background as a generalist and a specialist. If you'd like to talk more about careers in HR, I'm happy to help!

Answered 6 months ago

Stephanie Miller
0

Timeca

I am just curious to know - What fascinates you about Human Resources, since you are unsure about what occupations you could get into? And, yes you are right...It is fascinating. I have been in this field for about eight (8) years now. The different career paths you could take within Human Resources are Benefits and Compensation, Talent Acquisition, Training and Development or Employee Relations.

Answered 2 years ago

Timeca
0

Timeca

Yes, Human Resources is a fascinating field to pursue. Some occupations you can get into are Employee Relations, Training, Talent Acquisition/Recruiting, Benefits Administration and Compensation & Benefits.

Answered 2 years ago

Timeca
0

Alan Tecktiel

The wonderful thing about HR is the incredible variety of work that is available within the field. There are essentially two categories of roles broken down into generalist and specialist.

Generalists typically do a little bit of everything in support of a particular group within a company. This includes providing tools and consulting on performance management, discipline (employee relations), policy and compliance, and recruiting and talent management.. Often at larger organizations, generalists are really responsible for delivering the wide range of services and tools that are developed by other groups within HR, which brings us to specialist functions.

Specialist roles are available in compensation and benefits, recruiting, talent management, training and development, labor relations, diversity, and more. These roles focus on the design or tools, templates,programs and processes. It requires a deeper and more in depth knowledge while generalists need to have more breadth.

Many find it beneficial to being with a generalist job and do stints in specialist areas once they have enough exposure to know what they like.

Answered 3 years ago

Alan Tecktiel