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What is the best way to find an internship in your choice of study?

I've done "job searches" and I've e-mailed a few companies inquiring about internships with little/no success. What else could I attempt?

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3 Answers

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Ken Simmons

I could help further if you could provide more information relative to
where you are in school and in what school
in what community do you you reside
what is your major

Here are several ideas:
- talk to the head of alumni relations at your school to arrange to talk to graduates of your school in your major so that you can talk to them about internships - personal contact is best, as the companies and people with whom you talk will know of the level of commitment. Many times they know of some and can also share their experiences
- talk to the reference librarian at your local library to locate and contact professional organizations relating to your area of study in your area as they many know of some or even might sponsor some
- talk to your academic advisor and your favorite teachers and professors and your department head as they might have some ideas and connections

I would like to share an interesting situation with you. During my daughter's senior in high school, the high light of the year was to be the senior internship experience. Most students signed up for their desired topic area and waited, except for one girl. This girl wanted to be a doctor and to her internship with an EMS Unit. So, the worked with the local EMS Unit and her school to create her own internship. Needless to say, she was one of the ones who benefited most from the experience. This goes to show you that you have more control over the situation than you might realize.

Let me know what you think and let me know if you are able to have some luck from these suggestions.

Answered 4 months ago

Ken Simmons
0

Ken Simmons

The best way to make such inquiries is to do them in person, as the interpersonal element is very important and you have the ability to carry on a dialogue.

Here are some tips on getting involved in an internship
- talk to your academic advsor or your school counselor to get information about such programs and programs in which others in your career area have experienced
- talk to the head of alumni relations or the person who tracks graduates of your school to arrange to talk with them about their experiences and opportunities which they might have to offer
- talk to your school counselor and the reference librarian at your local library to locate professional associations which relate to your career area of interest as these association may know of or sponsor such opportunities
- talk to companies or organizations in your area who might be of interest to you about setting up your own internship.

Here is some good information that will help with this process:
https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-ask-for-an-informational-interview-and-get-a-yes

Here is something which I would like to share. During my daughter's senior year in high school, the high point was to be the senior internship experience. Everyone (except for one girl) put in their application and waited for an assignment. Just about everyone found the experience less that expected, except for one girl. Wanting to become a doctor, she had approached the local EMS unit about an internship and was able to work with them and her school to set up one which rivaled many others.

You have more power in this situation that you might realize.

Also, here is a site that might help, but try the others also. It is best not to rely on others for which you can possibly do better yourself.
https://www.fastweb.com/career-planning/interning/articles

Best of luck. Keep me posted. I would like to help further if needed.

Answered 4 months ago

Ken Simmons
0

Patrick Lincoln

Try talking face to face with somebody in the field. People are busy, and they need a certain guarantee of commitment before they are willing to give you their time. The best way to let you know that you are serious is to talk to them face to face.

Answered 2 years ago

Patrick Lincoln