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0

Anonymous

Other answers here have great tips. Make sure you've gone through the likely questions you'll be asked and know what your answers are. Be able to address how your experience applies to the requirements in the job decsription. If you can recruit a friend, or better yet, mentor, give them the list of likely questions, and ask them to interview you -- and have them add relevant questions they can think of as well. In-person practice is really the best thing!

Answered 3 years ago

Anonymous
0

Laura Bridgman

There are many resources/tools that are available to assist you with preparing for an interview. If you google "interviews", you'll find some very useful tips/guidance to assist you. Also, the library is a great resource. Preparing for an interview is critical so that you show up well to sell yourself to the company and the interviewer(s).

A couple of quick tips:
Know the job requirements for the position that you are interviewing for so that you can be prepared to give specific examples of how your skills/experiences match the job requirements.

Cover the basics such as firm handshake, eye contact, dress appropriately, be on time, send thank you note following the interview, etc.

Show confidence and enthusiasm at the interview. Why would the interviewer want to hire you? Keep this in mind so that you show up well.

Find out as much as possible about the company by researching their website, talking with people who work there, etc. That way, you get a feel of the company's culture and can speak knowledgeably at the interview.

Be prepared to have questions for the interviewer(s)

Hope this helps, and good luck!

Answered 3 years ago

Laura Bridgman
0

Anonymous

The best way to prepare for an interview is to think of all of the instances where you have made an impact on someone (including yourself) or something and write them down on paper. If you have a job now (whether it is part-time, volunteer or you are in charge of something around the house) use those examples first. If you do not have any work experience, you can use instances where you had an interaction with a friend or family member that was impactful. Try to stay away from personal examples if you can, but make sure they are packaged professionally, if you cannot. Once you have all of your examples written down, begin to categorize them into areas like - conflict resolution, teamwork, problem solving and time management. These are just a few common examples of areas that interviewers ask questions about, but study the job you are applying for to find other areas that they will ask you questions about and make sure you have examples to fit those too. Keep your responses brief, but full of relevant information. Always be clear in explaining the role YOU had in the scenario, not what "we" did to accomplish the task. It's easy to get nervous before or during the actual interview, so if you can have notes in the interview, jot down a couple of key words to remind you of the examples you plan to share. Breathe, relax and pause before you answer to gather your thoughts. Remember to smile, be pleasant and human - that goes a long way, unless you are interviewing with a robot. :)

Answered 3 years ago

Anonymous
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Stacy Cataldo

Practice. Have questions. SMILE! Personality matters so you want to smile to appear friendly. You are not only being interviewed for your skills, but whether or not you will be a fit.

I agree with asking for a business card. This is how I test candidates I interview. Not only do candidates ask for a business card, but do they follow up??? It is amazing. Some candidates I interview will not ask for a business card, but will be resourceful to find my email address. Other candidates will ask for a business card and not send a thank you--that irks me for a position where so much follow up is required!

Answered 3 years ago

Stacy Cataldo
0

Karey Bohmer

Research the company you are interviewing with. When they ask if you have any questions for them have some thoughtful questions prepared. Some questions I use are what's it like to work here on a day to day basis? What do you like about working here?

Answered 3 years ago

Karey Bohmer
0

Carlos Yupanqui

I agree with practice, I cannot emphasize enough how important it is to practice with someone in person and/or over the phone.

Be prepared to talk about every item on your resume. Honesty can go a long way, if you're not an expert at something, that is OK, don't pretend to be.

Always thank the interviewer(s) for their time with a firm handshake before leaving. Ask for a business card and send a follow-up email thanking them for their time and consideration.

Answered 3 years ago

Carlos Yupanqui
0

LaCashana Knight

Firstly, dress for success! First impressions are important in interviews. Next, research the company you are applying for. Know the company's history, goals, values, and mission statement if they have one. Be prepared to tell the company how you fit into their image of success and how you are going to help the company reach their goals. Finally, understand what you expect form the company and be prepared to eloquently express your expectations from them.

If you have someone to practice with it would be helpful. Also practice in the mirror. Be professional, articulate, and authentic. I hope this helps.

Answered 3 years ago

LaCashana Knight