Want free career or academic advice
from a professional?

Have an Answer?

6 Answers

2

Stephanie Cooper

First, breathe - it's not the end of the world. What I would suggest though is reading or taking a class on how to interview well. Really do your research on each company you interview with. It shows initiative.

Second - you might have to start at the bottom, entry level of some company. That's ok. Be more focused on getting in with a good company than with the actual position you start at. If you prove yourself and stay focused and work hard, you will move up quickly. Try not to change jobs in the beginning either. When you're first getting started, longevity and go a long way on your resume. And don't be afraid to branch out and do other projects in the company you get on with. Develop as many relevant skills as possible so you're more marketable if/when you do want to make a move.

Answered 3 years ago

Stephanie Cooper
1

Adam O'Connor

No experience, no problem. Experience comes from living and working, the key is that you have a degree in some field of higher education. If you have not already, I would highly recommend an internship. It may not be permanent, and you will be paid less, but the point is that you are gaining field-related experience and gaining contacts at the same time. Great resume and job search building.

If you have done so, job fairs are a great way to find companies that are looking to fill a position, and will let you talk in person with an HR or other company rep. (You might also find internship opportunities here as well)

Lastly, do not let "min 5 years experience necessary" or "1-3 years relevant experience necessary" stop you from applying. That is a company's way of easily filtering lower qualified, or passive candidates. If you have an appetizing resume, cover letter, and application to boot, there is a good chance you may get an interview from one of these companies and that get's the ball rolling. Use your interpersonal skills at this point to make yourself the irresistible candidate. (I would not recommend applying for work which requires more than 5 years experience if you have none though, that might be a stretch)

Answered 3 years ago

Adam O'Connor
1

Keisha Gregory

Hi The key is typically to gain experience while you are in high school or college. This way it won't be a challenge upon graduating because you will be able to already have an updated current resume with everything required for the positions you are interested in at that time. If you do not have any experience after you graduate then possibly volunteering, interning are two of the best ways to gain experience.

Answered 3 years ago

Keisha Gregory
0

Angela Regalado

There is no such thing as no experience after graduation, think about it. All the hard work you have done to reach that goal entails a lot of time invested in producing the results that led to that day! Any sort of activity you have participated in, whether on campus or in your community can be added to your resume as experience. It does not necessarily have to be directly related to your area of study, but it looks great to see that you are an active member within your school and/or community!

Answered 2 years ago

Angela Regalado
0

Bernie Tully

One way is to volunteer at a company at no pay(SORRY)for 60 days then ask them to consider you for the position.
Bernie

Answered 3 years ago

Bernie Tully
0

Tom Gresko

Get some experience volunteering at charity events or other opportunities that need people to help.

Answered 3 years ago

Tom Gresko