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1

Jinny Herman

It is important that you research well before even speaking with a recruiter. Be careful what you find online and ensure that the information you are researching on is accurate. If you have friends, classmates, or family in the military, speak with them about their experience. With friends/family who are older, keep in mind that their experience from joining, training, and military life may be quite different than what you would experience now. Keep an open mind. Nowadays, many people who are interested go to each branch to see their options. If you are unsure, look at all of your choices. This is a huge decision in your life. Best of luck with your decision.

Answered 3 years ago

Jinny Herman
0

Ayatollah Whiteman-best

The National Security Act of 1947 was a major restructuring of the United States government's military and intelligence agencies following World War II. The majority of the provisions of the Act took effect on September 18, 1947, the day after the Senate confirmed James Forrestal as the first Secretary of Defense.[1] His power was initially limited and it was easy for him to exercise the authority to make his office effective. This was later changed in the amendment to the act in 1949, creating what was to be the Department of Defense.[2]

The Act merged the Department of War (renamed as the Department of the Army) and the Department of the Navy into the National Military Establishment (NME), headed by the Secretary of Defense. It also created the Department of the Air Force, which separated the Army Air Forces into its own service. Initially, each of the three service secretaries maintained quasi-cabinet status, but the act was amended on August 10, 1949, to ensure their subordination to the Secretary of Defense. At the same time, the NME was renamed as the Department of Defense. The purpose was to unify the Army, Navy, and Air Force into a federated structure.[3]

Aside from the military reorganization, the act established the National Security Council, a central place of coordination for national security policy in the executive branch, and the Central Intelligence Agency, the U.S.'s first peacetime intelligence agency. The council's function was to advise the president on domestic, foreign, and military policies, and to ensure cooperation between the various military and intelligence agencies.[3]

The Joint Chiefs of Staff was officially established under Title II, Section 211 of the original National Security Act of 1947 before Sections 209–214 of Title II were repealed by the law enacting Title 10[4] and Title 32,[5] United States Code (Act of August 10, 1956, 70A Stat. 676) to replace them.

The act and its changes, along with the Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan, were major components of the Truman administration's Cold War strategy.

The bill signing took place aboard Truman's VC-54C presidential aircraft Sacred Cow, the first aircraft used for the role of Air Force One.[6]

Answered 2 years ago

Ayatollah Whiteman-best
0

Randolph Bonin

I don't have a background in recruiting, but I have served on active duty in the Air Force as a crew chief for heavy aircraft and then in the air national guard as crew chief on fighter aircraft. I can offer help on questions about differences in active duty and the national guard/reserves as I have served on both sides. Add me as a mentor or ask your specific questions if you have any concerning being a crew chief or between being on active service or guard/reserve service.

Answered 2 years ago

Randolph Bonin
0

GLENN

I would consider writing down all your goals in life. short term and long term. When you walk into the recruiting office they should be able to lay out a clear path on how to reach those goals. Then decide which branch would be the best route to go. Remember it is all about you and your future.

Answered 3 years ago

GLENN
0

LaCashana Knight

I would love to answer any questions you have about the military. I am in the Air Force. I have worked with all branches of the military and they all have their own advantages and perceived setbacks. if you like you can invite me as a mentor.

Answered 3 years ago

LaCashana Knight