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David Zhu

I agree with Timothy. Bottom line and reality check: Recruiters are going to ask enough about you to see if you qualify to join. Certain things, such as criminal history or drug use, MAY disqualify you. The reality is recruiters are people-pushers, they see you as a number to meet in their monthly quotas of how many people they recruit. Keep that in mind and always get a second opinion if anything doesn't sound right. Enlist for the job, rate, MOS that you WANT, not what they only have "available" to you right now!! If not currently available, you can wait, no one says you need to go to bootcamp right this second (besides yourself). Be in the position of power, because you really are, so keep that in mind!

Don't get me wrong, I love the Navy in my 11 years in so far, and will continue serving, however, there are good recruiters out there and bad, but ask yourself this: even with the good ones, what do they get paid to do? to persuade as much people each month NOT to join? no, good recruiters job is still to get people to join, so the better salemanship they have, the better they will be at their job. Keep that in mind.

Answered 4 months ago

David Zhu
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Timothy Naccarato

I served in the Army for 28 years, most s an Army lawyer, and retired as a Colonel. My experience indicates that all military recruiters will want to know your level of education, whether you have had any trouble with the law, whether you have any serious medical issues, what jobs you are interested in, where would you like to serve (understanding the military service will ultimately decide), what are your goals, and why do you want to enlist. You must understand that they will want you to sign a contract to serve a tour of duty--usually 3-4 years. Once you are sworn in, you cannot just quit because you do not like the training, the job, or your boss. So you must be certain that enlisting is what you want to do. That said, many find a home in the military and love it. There is structure and discipline, but also camaraderie and friendships knowing you are a vital member of a team. Good luck!

Answered 1 year ago

Timothy Naccarato