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Wilfred Ruck

Ha! First and foremost realize that the is no such thing as time management. You CANNOT manage time, you can only manage yourself and the times you decide to do things, what you decide to do, and the sequence you do them in.

First Things First -Stephen Covey


Read it at least 25 times. While it's more expensive, I suggest the audible version since you are so busy, you won't have time to read, you can listen to it while doing other things.

Answered 2 years ago

Wilfred Ruck
0

Jon Ashworth

I agree with Wilfred. You can only manage yourself around the time that you have.
I went to college full time and worked full time. What helped me was first to prioritize what I needed to get done. Then take that list and decide how much time I needed to allot for each. Once this is determined I could manage those tasks around what I call the "definite".
I DEFINITELY have to attend class. I DEFINITELY have to go to work. I DEFINITELY had to study. And I DEFINITELY had to get a good amount of sleep.

I had to work around the things that could not be changed for my situation. Work so I could eat. Go to class to learn. Study so I could pass. And sleep so i could do it all over again.

I even went as far as writing out a schedule and tweaking it as needed. Until I found what worked.
You also might have to ditch certain activities that impede your progress. I'm not saying don't have a life though!!

Jon

Answered 2 years ago

Jon Ashworth
0

Martha Paxton

When I went to school full time and worked full time the thing that helped me the most was to keep a schedule and carve out time every day for my homework and time to study. It is important when you are carrying such a big load that you balance your life. You need to have time to play, but time to study as well. The thing that worked the best for me was to pick my study time and keep that time every day. Consistency is helpful to get you into a healthy habit to accomplish all you may have on your plate.

Answered 2 years ago

Martha Paxton
0

Adele Robinson Rodriguez

I strongly suggest having a calendar and planner where you can visually jot down your next move. This is what I do especially with work, school and volunteer groups, it's really good to get a visual on what my day will be looking like so I do not over book myself.

Also, try your best to do school work as soon as possible or on any free time. I find that also works for me to make sure I am on top of my school work.

I also agree with having a set time for yourself so you do not burnout your mind.

Answered 2 years ago

Adele  Robinson Rodriguez
0

Marie Johns

• At the beginning of each semesters review your work schedule. Schedule your vacation and other benefit time around your exams and term paper.
• Use one day out of the week to relax an order not to burnout.
• If you are working for a company that is very demanding, take your books or electronic devices with you, use your lunch break as a study session.
• If you are traveling long distance to work via public transportations, use that a study session. You will be surprise of how covenant it to study in a public places. Most people respect your privacy and your space.
• Take power naps for 10 to 15 minutes it will help you concentrate better.

Answered 2 years ago

Marie  Johns
0

Erick Rodas

Wilfred is spot on! I know it may not be what you want to hear, but Covey's book, "The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People", has changed the way many people live their lives.

Take care of the priorities first, avoid any and all distractions (Facebook, twitter...), and have a plan. Taking five minutes to write down what you have to do can motivate you to get them done, and avoid the mental lag you'll experience later on in the day. Remember, If you do the things you have to do, when you have to do them, there will be a day where you can do the things you want to do, when you want to do them!

Answered 2 years ago

Erick Rodas