Want free career or academic advice
from a professional?

Have an Answer?

8 Answers

1

Avanese Taylor

It can be done. But it is not easy. You just have to be focused and stay determined on getting to the finish line. Online classes can definitely give you some flexibility. I was able to obtain my Masters while working full time, managing a family, and dealing with life's challenges. There were plenty of times that I wanted to quit but I was determined to finish my goals. Good luck to you.

Answered 2 years ago

Avanese Taylor
0

Christian Elena

Personally, I'm going through this as I type. I have a side business that I have to attend, Im also a student Full-time and I have a 4 months baby and I have a job, Part-time. I can tell you it's not easy at all but I can sure be worth it if you know where you are going and your goals are set out properly.

"The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stand in the moment of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at time of CHALLENGE. " - Dr. Martin Luther king Jr.

I would also like to share this quote with you:
There is one thing 99 percent of "failures" and "successful" people have in common - They all hate doing the same things. The difference is successful people do them anyways.

You can make it, a longest your desires are great enough. Find out the reasons, WHY.

Answered 2 years ago

Christian  Elena
0

Amanda Hurley

Working a full-time job and balancing an undergraduate degree course is a daunting task; however, it can be done. The important thing to remember is balance. Find that balance in your life that allows you to complete your work, school, and still balance a home life all in one. I worked full time while attending school and I found it helpful to study on my lunch breaks; if I had a spare moment, do some school work on my computer while at work.

It is hard but it is something that is doable. Try not to let one part of your life consume the others and keep that balance and you'll do fine.

Answered 3 years ago

Amanda Hurley
0

Laura Havlick

I wouldn't try to do it that way. I went to school full-time and worked part-time at school as a workstudy student. That worked best for me. Usually working full-time doesn't leave you enough time to go to class and study. Most jobs are during the day and you have to take night classes to go to school, and usually there's less choices in classes available at night. Also that leaves out any chance for a social life and that's pretty important, no matter what your age. Also, going to school at night will take much longer to get finished and you might get discouraged and want to quit school because of it. I hope you are able to consider other ways to do it. And of course, I know there's also finances to be taken into account and that may be why you're considering working full-time in the first place. I took out some student loans and applied for workstudy jobs. As a workstudy, I was able to work at the English Dept. 2-5pm every day and that helped a lot. Good luck!

Answered 3 years ago

Laura Havlick
0

Randolph Bonin

As other have responded, working full-time and going to school part-time to get through your undergraduate education can be challenging. Challenging is however not a bad thing. As stated by Booker T. Washington, "Nothing ever comes to one, that is work having, except as a result of hard work." For most people work full-time is an inevitability as we all need to find a way to finance our day life activities and particularly college may just be one of the bigger items to finance. As an individual that worked full-time in the military while attending college part-time to complete my undergraduate coursework, I can attest to the fact that it can be accomplished (even with a wife and small children). I am a type that likes to keep a very organized schedule of my week so I can know what time and how much activity I am required to do on any given day. It was for this fact that I was able to succeed because I could easily visualize my time commitments and know what I really had to sacrifice for school. One final big factor on the difficulty in full-time work paired with part-time school is what specifically the degree program is. There are just some degree programs that take major time commitments that have very little flexibility, while there are more and more online programs that are becoming nationally recognized and are starting to receive some of the most prestigious accreditations as well.

As is the case in all things in life, this is a matter of prioritization. If you set your mind towards making progress in a degree program (even if it is one course at a time) you will get to the end eventually. Not to discourage you but it is important that you know that even in the easiest most flexible program adding in school will likely require some sacrifice in activity in some other part of your life. By mentally preparing for that and creating a mechanism for staying organized with all the different time commitments you may face you should be able to make the transition to taking classes as painless as possible. Just remember the rule of study...for every semester credit hour a class is the professor expects 2-3 hours of study and preparation time for that class each week. This means that in a traditional 3 credit course you should plan for 6-9 hours of study and preparation time for that class in addition to the time spent in class.

Answered 3 years ago

Randolph Bonin
0

Lakiesha Singh

Www.ratracerebellion.com/?
Go to this link you will find jobs that allow you to work from home and pick your own schedule, only thing you need is a quite arrea, land line pone, and a computer, some companies require that you pay for your own background check, but you will make money on your own time. This is actually how i paid for my college education.

Answered 3 years ago

Lakiesha  Singh
0

Jamie

Working full-time while going to school can be challenging, especially when you also have to find ways to balance your personal life. As an undergraduate I went to school and worked full-time. While challenging and at times frustrating, I also learned valuable skills that have helped me in my career. Going to school and working forced me to learn how to prioritize tasks and greatly improved my time management skills. Even though this is the "technology age" I still use a paper planner. I find that writing things down and planning ahead is a great way to balance my responsibilities. Just remember, if you ever feel overwhelmed, take a step back and re evaluate the situation. By breaking tasks down they become more manageable. Best of luck on your future academic endeavors!

Answered 3 years ago

Jamie
0

LaCashana Knight

It is not as hard as one might believe if you are organized and prepared. I completed a undergrad and a great chunk of my graduate degree while working full time. At one point I even had a part time job as well. Many universities offer programs that can accommodate a full-time work schedule. Classes are available on the weekends and at night. There is also the option of taking online courses. Utilizing this option gives you the freedom to go to school on a more flexible schedule.

Your "free" time will be minimal, but that is one of the sacrifices you might have to make. Try looking for a full-time job that might permit time to work on your school work. There are many jobs that have ample downtime. What is your career of choice? It might even be an option to use work experience towards your degree.

Answered 3 years ago

LaCashana Knight