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How much does my college major affect my future career?

I am interested in both biology and finance. I don't know which one to pick!

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13 Answers

4

Susan Cucinotta

It depends. It is nice to focus on what you intend on doing career wise. Select a minor in another subject, which is similar. I have found most adults 35 and under, still don't know what they want to be when they grow up. It's today's era. Trial and error.

Major in one subject, minor the second,.that's the perfect solution. If along your college term you decide to change and you cannot change your degree, I suggest volunteering in the field of career interest to gain exposure.

Answered 3 years ago

Susan Cucinotta
2

Ryan Kim

Unfortunately, there is no set answer to your question. While your undergraduate degree can certainly influence your first job out of college, it won't necessarily dictate your future career. Often times individuals end up "falling into" a career they never intended to have. Keep in mind that your major is not a life sentence, you will have opportunities throughout your career to change direction or move forward in a given field.

Both biology and finance are highly versatile majors and can lend themselves quite well to quantitative careers. Keep in mind you don't necessarily have to choose one over the other; work with your university guidance counselors to explore your options, whether it is truly dedicating yourself to one degree, double- majoring, or creating a whole new interdisciplinary degree. If you must choose one or the other, test them out first before really committing.

Best of luck!

Answered 3 years ago

Ryan Kim
2

Karen Gonzalez

I would definitely suggest trying to get some experience in both fields early in your college career, maybe some internships or shadowing if possible.
Double majoring is always a choice, however definitely try to have a clear picture of what your want to do after graduation. Do you want to go to grad school? Do you want to get working experience right after college? If so, where?

Answered 3 years ago

Karen Gonzalez
1

Sikha Sajeev

You college major will considerably affect your future career, if you plan on starting your career as soon as your graduate.
For instance, if you do your major in biology and after your graduate, you decide that you want a career in finance, it might be a little difficult to find a job in finance with your background being in Bio.
Unless, you decide to go for higher studies and opt for a major in finance or participate in finance internships/projects so as to build a background in finance in your resume.

Answered 3 years ago

Sikha Sajeev
1

Rachel Collier

I think the answer is that the more technical and specific the position is, the more your major will affect your future career. If you are going to go into the sciences or technical field, there are likely very specific degrees employers are looking for when filling positions (i.e. you may need to have a Chemical Engineering degree or Civil Engineering degree, etc). If you are going into marketing or finance, you will likely have more flexibility. For example, you may have a degree in Math or Statistics, a Business Degree or Economics.

Answered 3 years ago

Rachel Collier
1

Chandra Marston

It all depends upon what you want to do with your future. In biology, you could go on and get your Master's degree in it and even a PhD and either teach or do research. Finance is good for the field of business and you could go on and get your MBA and work in the business field. It all depends upon which area you want to work in in the future-teach and/or do research or work in the business world.

Answered 3 years ago

Chandra Marston
1

Thomas Sullivan

Hello,

I've known few people who have majored in biology or went to medical school and decided to pursue a career in finance. They both worked in labs and then somehow got exposure to finance world. To give two examples, one is a biotech analyst at a boutique investment banking firm and the other one is an analyst at a hedge fund. Specific majors can provide an edge particularly with a major as technical as biology. If a firm is looking for a junior analyst, I strongly feel that they would be interested in a biology major over a english, literature or even a business major.

I have another friend who studied biology and then went to become managing partner at the largest patent litigation law firm specializing in the pharmaceutical industry.

I hope that helps and good luck. Tom

Answered 3 years ago

Thomas Sullivan
0

Amanda Lopez

It’s a tough choice. I got my undergrad in History but after many random internships and short lived job opportunities, I realized I would need to get my Ph.D. in History to be, ultimate job, a professor of history with at least 7 years of field work to even apply for such a position. When it comes to your job, you need to decide on what is the most important. I would do research on potential positions you can receive with a degree in biology or finance, and see which is a more ideal career path for yourself. You should set up interviews with professionals in both fields and get a first-hand perspective on what types of jobs are available and what type of certification is needed. That way you will know the general process in obtaining a certain degree and professional level.

Answered 1 year ago

Amanda Lopez
0

Vanon Keeya

I don't want to actually pick for you exactly to take, but i suggest you pick Biology. Not because its hard which it is, but because it has more jobs in the future it will earn you a comfortable living to live the life you would want to live no matter the circumstances. That the reality of the job industry right now. But before you go ahead to choose what you want to do, i advise that you actually like what you picking because that makes it more interesting and easier for you to adjust quickly. Follow your heart.

Answered 3 years ago

Vanon Keeya
0

Laura Havlick

How about choosing a major in one and minor in the other? Or majoring in one and getting lots of classes in the other when your major requirements are satisfied? I have heard lots of stories of people who had different interests and pursued one or the other and years later they find a way to use what they've learned in both, sometimes even combining the two in a way they never thought during their college years. You might consider taking the one that you're most comfortable with or most excited about as your major, since that would insure good grades. Just know that it's rarely a straight line from college major to profession. There are lots of twists and turns in life. That's what makes it so interesting. And these days, it is becoming more common to have several careers, one after the other. So you never know!

Answered 3 years ago

Laura Havlick
0

Thaion Savannah

Your major specifies the career path you would most likely be interested in but you can always have a minor which is a completely different field from your major. In college you choose a minor and a major you graduate with expertise in both.

Answered 3 years ago

Thaion Savannah
0

Nicole Olivia Jackson

I would checkout jobs online and see what they offer. I do not think that students do this enough which can cause problems later. See what looks good. I changed majors twice before I found something I liked. I went from graphic communications to broadcasting and finally to instructional design.

After taking a few classes, you may find what you are looking for in a career. Like everyone else who commented suggested, you could always minor in one. If you still cannot decide, there is always the possibility of double majoring.

Answered 3 years ago

Nicole Olivia Jackson
0

Angela Riehle

Your core classes affect your future career a lot. What I mean by this is that these classes (which all of them will pertain to your major) will further your knowledge in your career path. For example, I am a Communication Arts major and I am interested in Business Management and Business Admin type of work. Classes like Project Management and Directed Research expanded my knowledge far beyond anything I would have imagined. I have realized recently that a lot of businesses are looking for a certain type of skill sets as well, most of which are covered in the classes I am taking or have already taken. So, definitely decide carefully, but also discern on what you are more passionate about, biology or finance.

Answered 3 years ago

Angela Riehle