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Abhijeet Bhat

I think one of the ways to keep yourself motivated is to have a role model in life. In your area of study or any profession you would like to pursue, find someone who is successful and has accomplished great things. Whenever you find yourself distracted or wasting time, you can think about this individual and imagine all the hard work he/she has put in to become successful.

Answered 2 years ago

Abhijeet Bhat
0

Tanya Zhelezcheva

I agree that accountability is big!!! Hope you can find a buddy. But you can also try a forum like phinished.org where phd students work on their dissertations. They use the Pomodoro technique: you work for 25 min only (no more, no less), and then you take a 5min break (with physical activity, not internet browsing). Internet browsing/ time wasting is the reward after you get the work done.

Also, do the tough things first thing in the morning.

Check out: http://calnewport.com

There are so many books written on this topic. You are not alone in learning how to use your time efficiently.

Answered 2 years ago

Tanya Zhelezcheva
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Alyssa Nabors

I really struggled with this in college. I hope that your motivation would be first to learn as much as possible! But it's good to have strategies for keeping yourself on task. A good way to start is trying to identify your distractors.

1. Social Media Sites - If you find yourself checking Facebook every five minutes (or Tumblr or Twitter or Imgur or whatever else) there are plugins to browsers you can download, blocking access to certain sites during specific times. These ARE easily circumventable, but it requires a conscious effort which makes you more aware of how much time you're using.

2. Procrastivity - If you find yourself cleaning the entire dorm/apartment, or finally writing that letter to your grandmother, or painting a recreation of the Sistine Chapel on your wall, you're being productive but not in the way you intended. Have your priorities straight before you start in on your to-do list. The dishes can wait if your exam is at 8am.

3. Environment - You have to figure out what works for you. Some people are productive only in the quiet, some need background noise like a Law & Order marathon or the radio. Some people do really well in groups and some will absolutely get nothing done unless they are alone. Location is a factor too - will you be in your room or in the library? It might take some trial & error but if you're not studying effectively try changing something to see if it helps.

4. Accountability - One of the biggest differences between high school and college is that the assignments and exams are spaced out much more in college courses. This makes procrastinating seem less harmful when the deadline is four weeks away... and then you blink and the paper is due tomorrow. If you need someone to watch your back, get a buddy. Check in with each other and keep each other on schedule. It's easier to stay on track when you know you'll have to own up to what you've been doing on a regular basis.

These aren't all the things that can keep you from being productive, and the solutions I've suggested won't work for everyone, but it's a good place to start!

Answered 2 years ago

Alyssa Nabors
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Edward Graves

Find motivation by writing down what you want to achieve and read it aloud to yourself first thing every morning and the last thing before bed. Tell people what you wrote. Find someone in a book that achieved what they wanted and they let nothing stop them (ask at the library for books about hero in your area of interest). Having a study schedule, with no excuses why not to, is a necessity. Also have a predetermined length of time to study. Focus your attention on one task at a time until it is completed.

Answered 1 year ago

Edward Graves
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Danielle Reff

You must must must keep a schedule and stick to it. For each time you are successful give yourself some sort of gift or present. (A small one) Just remember not to overwhelm yourself with the schedule.

Answered 2 years ago

Danielle Reff
0

Erin Gallagan

I think you should set a time block to study, and then reward yourself for actually doing it. The reward can be simple too, like allowing yourself 15 minutes to browse the internet, or 30 minutes to watch a tv show. Use a calendar to schedule an hour of study time, and then schedule your reward. The reward will hopefully keep you motivated, and on track.

Answered 2 years ago

Erin Gallagan
0

Iris Fanning

Hi,

FOCUS! Turn off all electronic devices unless you're using it to study. Then, make an appointment with yourself for a 2-3 hour time block to only study. If you study best at the library, do that...if it's at Starbucks do that. Get up every 40 minutes and move around (a brain focus thing). Then have some fun after that block of time and schedule another 2-3 hours.

You'll be surprised if you let yourself get in the flow of thinking/learning how easy it is. It does take discipline. Challenge yourself to learn to enjoy new learning, creative thinking and new knowledge!

Blessings!
Iris

Answered 2 years ago

Iris Fanning