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Ryan Gilbert

Evaluate how you currently spend you time. Most people will find multiple hours that are used for activities deemed unworthy of the time allocated to them. Things like watching tv, social networks, intramurals, etc. are great tools to alleviate stress and remain sane throughout the college experience. However, abuse of these tools may result i excessive time spent towards them. First, find out what these time wasters are. Then take some steps to actively manage how much time is allocated toward them

I suggest researching some study techniques and implementing them. Something like the Pomodoro timer (https://tomato-timer.com/) can help to optimize focus and break times on a subject. The internet has a lot of amazing ways of allocating your time on studying to get the most out of smaller periods of time. Try a few over the course of a week and see how they turn out!

Writing things down does two amazing things for productivity.
1. It allows you to free up active space in your mind for something that you need/want to focus on. We have all had the instance of worrying about forgetting a homework assignment while you type to complete an essay of a completely unrelated subject. If it's written down, you have permission to forget about it and remind yourself later.
2. It helps you to remember what's required. When you have tasks written down on a list that you check regularly, it won't be forgotten easily.
Organizing these tasks into a journal or planner will have the added benefit of supplying you with due dates and a prioritization list.

Answered 2 years ago

Ryan Gilbert
0

Julie Miller

My suggestion is to first identify how you are spending your time by collecting data. Keep a log for a minimum of 1 week, ideally for 15 minute intervals. You can use a simple spreadsheet, a day planner or piece of paper to capture this information. Then ask yourself – “what is my data telling me?” Are you spending your time on things that aren’t really important to you right now? Are you doing things more perfectly than they need to be done? Is your time being used efficiently?

Identify some high level themes from your data, and consider some possible root causes. For example, if efficiency is one of your themes, some of the root causes might be that you do too much multitasking, or you allow distractions such as texting or phone calls to interrupt your flow, or you are trying to work alongside of friends that are spending more time socializing than working on the task at hand. What jumps out at you?

For items you believe offer you your best opportunity for improvement, create a specific objective statement. If one of the problems is that you have too many distractions while you are trying to study, your objective statement might be “I will unplug during study time (no cell phone, email, radio, etc.).” Then track how many successes you have in meeting your objective in order to hold yourself accountable. And don’t forget to congratulate yourself when start seeing your improvements!

Good luck

Answered 2 years ago

Julie Miller
0

Natasha Ward

After your first semester, you receive more insight about college life, you finally have a GPA, and you learn what areas of study need more attention. For study skills, take advantage of professor's office hours and study groups that pertain to your class. Create a schedule of priority for your day and week. Only focus on them first, and then the secondary items come next. When you are studying, only study. That means no phone and no social media; it's just you and the books. Cut out distractions that aren't helpful toward your end goal--graduation. I wish you well this semester and the others to come. Don't forget to celebrate your successes along the way. Thanks for reaching out.

Answered 2 years ago

Natasha Ward
0

Manisha Jain

It is a good way to start the new semester, It seems you were adjusting to new mode of college. Now that you have experienced the first one you know things get harder every coming semester but at the same they get manageable.

However, If you had been trying new clubs or giving more time to fraternity groups then cut your involvements to half. Prioritize your work load. Start with making a list of what needs most attention, Take 5 things of the list and make them your top choices then one by one complete them and see how much time you have in hand to accommodate others.This will keep you on a go and you will feel less stressed or anxious. Also motivation of treating your self with something you like will keep you away from distractions. Hope this works!

Good luck
Ms. Jain

Answered 2 years ago

Manisha Jain